Should I have an AED on my site?


The guidelines for a public facility to have an AED are based on Heart and Stroke Guidelines and established best practices from across Canada and the USA. When determining the placement of an AED for public access, the following considerations should be made:

  • Location/Response Considerations  
    AEDs are most useful if placed in locations where EMS response may be prolonged.  Communities with no AED and long response times by EMS should be given highest priority when considering AED placement. Public buildings that are centrally located within a community and Fire Response without an AED (due to the device being mobile) are preferred sites for AEDs.  
  • Population
    The number of people at a given site and the average age of person at a site play a significant role in determining the need for an AED.  There should be, on average, at least one public event per week in the facility.
  • Activity
    A person is at slightly higher risk of death from Sudden Cardiac Arrest during or right after vigorous exertion. Certain activities have higher inherent risks than others. Shovelling following a snow storm and sports such as hockey, soccer and basketball have historically played a contributing factor in causing Sudden Cardiac Arrest after vigorous exertion (New England Journal of Medicine, November 2010).

See also: Heart & Stroke Foundation of Canada position statement on public access to AEDs.


Calgary, Alberta, Canada